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Sidewalk Program



Can my entrance walk be replaced under this program?

No, only sidewalk in the public right of way can replaced under this program. Moreover, the City can not be responsible for inspecting and/or guaranteeing the quality of any “side deals” made between the property owner and any contractor to construct\replace entrance walks.

If the City makes the repairs, what are my payment options?

Following completion of the work by the City, an invoice will be mailed to you for the assessment based on the dimensions of actual work completed, interest, advertising, legal, administrative, and inspection fees associated with the project.

You will have the opportunity to payoff the assessment in full within 60 days of notice or over a two-year period (with interest added) on real estate tax bills.

For additional information contact the Assessment Department at 419-698-7012.

Would it be cheaper to hire a contractor myself?

All City contracts must include provisions for contractors to pay employees the “prevailing wage rate” as established by the State of Ohio Department of Labor. The prevailing wage requirement can, but not always, result in unit prices higher than what you might be able to contract privately for similar work.

In addition, the assessment will include interest, advertising, legal, administrative, and inspection fees associated with administering project.

If the City makes the repairs, how much will it cost?

A You will pay for the actual quantity of work performed on your property by the City’s contractor based on the contract unit prices along with interest, advertising, legal, administrative, and inspection fees associated with the project. 

The City estimates that it will cost between $6.50 to $8.50 per square foot.

If I do not make the repairs, when will the City perform the work?

After the given time frame for property owners to make repairs, a contractor hired by the City following a competitive bidding process would perform the proposed work. The actual work would most likely be performed in late summer into fall. A notice will be provided to property owners prior to the actual work starting.

How can I tell if the concrete in my sidewalk is in good condition?

Visually inspect the surface of the sidewalk for any hairline cracks, flaking, pitting, scaling or spalling of the concrete.  If any of these deficiencies are noted, an evaluation should be made as to the severity to determine if it is best to replace the concrete slab.

In addition, the concrete should be sounded to evaluate its condition for any delaminations.  Delamination is a horizontal splitting, cracking, or separation of a slab in a plane roughly parallel to, and generally near, the upper surface.

Sounding is a technique to evaluate the condition of hardened concrete by striking the surface with a hammer.  Sound concrete will exhibit a clear ringing sound, whereas dull or hollow sounds indicate delaminated areas.  Another procedure to sound concrete would be by dragging a chain over the concrete surface.  Again, dull or hollow sounds indicate delaminated areas, whereas solid concrete would exhibit a clear ringing sound.  In most cases, if any delamination is detected, the concrete should be replaced.

If I replace a slab marked with an "O" will the City reimburse me for this expense?

Not if tree removal is required, otherwise contact the Department of Public Service.

Do all slabs marked with a white letter need to be removed and replaced?

Not in all cases.  Concrete removal and replacement is the traditional method for sidewalk repair when the damage is so extensive that alternative methods are not enough to make the necessary repairs.  Today there are a wide variety of sidewalk repair technologies available that, when implemented correctly, can result in major savings of both time and money.

In some instances if the sidewalk concrete is in good condition and there is only a vertical misalignment along the seam between slabs (See Stub Toe and Longitudinal Slope in Sidewalk Inspection Criteria) it may be possible to correct the problem by one of the following methods.

1. Concrete Raising (Slabjacking):

Concrete raising is a repair method that lifts concrete sidewalk slabs back to their original position by pressure injecting cement or non cement material under the sidewalk.  Holes are drilled through the slab and grout is injected to raise the concrete slab or to fill the voids under them. Although it is less costly than replacement, it is only effective on sunken sidewalks.  There are many contractors that specialize in performing this type of work.

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This is a good alternative when the sidewalk concrete is in satisfactory condition with no cracks or structural defects.  One draw back to this method is the greater the slab needs to be adjusted the greater the possibility of the slab settling in the future.

2. Concrete Grinding: 

before_afterConcrete grinding is a relatively new technology used to remove trip hazards in concrete walkways by reducing slight protrusions on a concrete surface by removing a thin layer of concrete.  After grinding, the surface is left even on both sides with a gradual slope instead of a dangerous edge.

Concrete grinding is a good alternative if the lip (stub toe) between concrete slabs is between 1/2" to 1".

3.  Repairing Cracks, Gaps, or Pits in Your Sidewalks

If your sidewalk slab is cracked, pitted or there are gaps between slabs that have been identified as the only problem with the sidewalk and the remaining concrete is in good condition it may be possible to correct the problem without replacing the concrete by simply filling the cracks, pits, or gaps.  See the following for information related to this repair method.

 

Contact the Department of Public Service at (419) 698-7047 to determine if your sidewalk could be repaired by any of these methods or for additional information related to these items.

A sidewalk permit is only required for the replacement of sidewalks. The permit can be obtained through the Building and Zoning Department.  You may only hire a contractor registered, licensed and bonded with the City of Oregon to repair or replace your sidewalks.  A list of licensed sidewalk contractors can be obtained through the Building and Zoning Inspection Department

Who can I hire to make the repairs?

You may only hire a contractor registered, licensed and bonded  with the City of Oregon.  A list of licensed sidewalk contractors can be obtained through the Building and Zoning Inspection Department.

Where do I apply for a permit?

All applications for permits are accepted at the permit desk in the Building & Zoning Inspection Office in the east wing of the Oregon Municipal Building located at 5330 Seaman Road.

Building and Zoning Inspection Department
Phone 419-698-7071 or 419-698-6077

Can I do the repairs myself?

Yes, during the given time frame, property owners may perform the required repairs or replacements themselves.  A sidewalk permit is required for the replacement of the sidewalk through the Building and Zoning Department.

Construction of sidewalks must be in accordance with the City of Oregon’s “Rules and Regulations for Construction of Driveways, Sidewalks, and Curbcuts in the Public Right of Way” available through the Department of Public Service or Building and Zoning Department.  No concrete shall be poured without inspection by the Building and Zoning Department.  Failure to get an inspection may require removal of the material.

Can I replace additional sections of my sidewalk in the Right of Way not marked deficient under this program?

The City has limited funding budgeted for the Sidewalk Replacement Program. Until contract unit prices and quantities of work for the program are established, the City cannot commit to any additional replacement of sidewalk through the program.

However, you may contact the Department of Public Service at (419) 698-7047 to be added to a list for additional replacement sidewalk not marked.  After unit prices and quantities of work for the program have been established, on a first come first serve basis the additional sidewalk can be added to the program as funding permits.

Will the City remove a tree that is damaging my sidewalk?

Every effort will be made to preserve trees.  To avoid cutting tree roots or removing trees, the slab replacement may require a change in the sidewalk alignment.

The City of Oregon Tree Commission will be consulted regarding the useful life of some street trees in the right of way.  Street trees in the right of way that are deemed unhealthy or potentially hazardous by the City of Oregon Tree Commission will be removed and replaced with a new tree suitable for the location.

The removal and replacement of any trees outside the right of way shall be at the property owner’s discretion and cost.

Where can I get additional information related to the sidewalk program?

Contact the Department of Public Service at:

5330 Seaman Road
Oregon, OH 43616

Office Hours: 8:00 - 4:30

Phone: 419-698-7047
Fax: 419-691-0241

How are the deficient sidewalk locations determined?

Each year an area of the City will be selected for the Department of Public Service to inspect sidewalks based on the Sidewalk Inspection Criteria.

Sidewalk sections meeting any of the Sidewalk Inspection Criteria will be marked with a white letter denoting the sidewalk deficiency and will be the responsibility of the property owner to repair or replace.  Sidewalk sections marked with a white “O” will be replaced or repaired at the City of Oregon’s expense if it is determined that a tree in the right of way caused the damage.

Why doesn’t the City repair or replace the sidewalk in front of my house?

The Ohio Revised Code, Chapter 723 states that "The legislative authority of a municipal corporation, in addition to the powers conferred by Section 729.01 to 729.10, inclusive, of the Ohio Revised Code, may require, by ordinance, by the imposition of suitable penalties or otherwise, that the owners and occupants of abutting lots and lands shall keep the sidewalks, curbs, and gutters in repair and free from snow and any nuisance."

The City of Oregon, in its Code under Section 909.02 - Duty to Maintain Sidewalks states that "Every owner of any lot or parcel of land situated within the corporation limits of the City shall keep and maintain sidewalks now or hereafter constructed along all streets adjoining such land in good order and repair and free from nuisance.  Furthermore, each such owner shall construct good and sufficient sidewalks abutting the property owned by him as provided in this chapter and the laws of the State".